dmv vehicle registration procedures for licensed car dealers

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dmv occupational licensing inspector for our fremont car dealer class

after you take our

fremont car dealer class

you will take your dmv car dealer examination

and

submit your car dealer license application

to the dmv licensing inspector in hayward

Hayward, 150 Jackson Street, 94544

    • (510) 728-1349

Directions to this office

CLICK HERE FOR OUR PRACTICE DMV LICENSING EXAMINATION

got1

current list of dmv certified car dealer license schools

DMV Dealer Education Providers

Dealer education providers listed by type of class offered area (served) and name.
Area and
Type of Class Offered
Online/Home Study Continuing Education title Bay Area title Northern Area title Central Area title Southern Area title Provider
**X Auto Support Group
Phone: 1-714-588-1511
Email: E2000perez@yahoo.com
X Best Solutions
Phone: 1-619-546-4064
X X X X X Motorsports Market On-Line Courses, Live Classes and Home Study
Phone: 1-800-980-1967
Internet: www.motorsportsmarket.com
X X X X X Automotive Systems Analysis
Phone: 1-800-564-0984
Internet: www.autosystemsanalysis.com
X X X X X TriStar Motors, LLC
Phone: 1-800-901-5950
Internet: www.gotplates.com
X X 24-7 Dealer Training Specialists
Phone: 1-951-833-8398
Internet: www.24-7dealerclass.com
X X California Auto Dealer Education
Phone: 1-661-871-3311
Internet: www.cadeclasses.com
X Central Valley Dealers
Licensing Renewal Service
Phone: 1-209-333-0900
Email: chuckwentland@aol.com
X Superior Vehicle Dealer Training Institute
Phone: 1-949-305-8402
Internet: www.superiorbonds.com
X X Inland Empire/Orange County Dealer School
Phone: 1-909-880-1380
Internet: www.bigcardealer.com
X X X Dealer Training Experts of Northern California
Phone: 1-408-910-3876
Internet: www.dealersclass.com
X X X X X Dealer Intel
Phone: 1-415-613-4754
Internet: www.dealerintel.com
X X X X X $85 Dealer Education
Phone: 1-951-541-8390
Internet: www.waynesinsurance.com
X X X X Los Angeles Dealer School
Phone: 1-310-227-6920
Internet: www.dealerclass.com
*X Dealer License Seminars of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-665-6440
Internet: www.dealerseminars.com
X X X X X Golden State Educational Services
Phone: 1-916-395-7004
Internet: www.goldenstateeducation.com
X X Dealer Lessons
Phone: 1-877-772-3332
Internet: www.dealerlessons.com
X X X X X Dealer Education Services
Phone: 1-888-323-0031
Internet: www.dealereducation.com
X X Coffer Dealer Education
Phone: 1-888-694-1444
Internet: www.cofferdealereducation.com
X Cesar Carrascos Dealer Licensing Seminars
Phone: 1-619-474-0477
Internet: www.carrascogroup.com
X Colby Learning Center of San Diego
Phone: 1-619-559-5748
Email: colbylearning@aol.com
X X Dealers Support Group
Phone: 1-818-758-9951
Internet: www.dealerssupport.com
X Online Auto Dealer ED
Phone: 1-877-724-6150
Internet: www.onlineautodealered.com
X California Accredited Dealer Education
Phone: (714) 300-4148
Email:: cadeclass@aol.com

*Prelicensing only
**Continuing Education only

Last updated: 07/23/2012

dmv retro license plates may make a revival

Retro license plate proposal on the move

California lawmakers can’t roll back gas prices or revive eight-track tape players, but they soon may offer motorists something else from decades past: replica license plates.

Assembly Bill 1658 would allow the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue plates resembling those of the 1950s, through ’80s for a fee – $50 initially, $40 per year – to cover administrative costs and raise money for environmental projects.

Assemblyman Mike Gatto, a Los Angeles Democrat who proposed the bill, said it capitalizes on nostalgia and recent production of retro-style vehicles. “What’s old is new,” he says, “and it might make the state a little money, too.”

Plates would not be issued by the DMV until 7,500 had been ordered by the public. They would come in three classic designs, with black lettering on a yellow background, or yellow lettering on either a black or blue background.

The new plates would not be exact reproductions, however. Current plates have seven digits, for example, while those of decades past had six. Reflectivity and font-type standards also have changed through the decades.

AB 1658 received bipartisan support in the Assembly Transportation Committee, 14-0, and is awaiting action in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

got plates logo4

 

ADESA auto auction application

Dealer Registration Forms

ADESA auctions are for registered wholesale automotive dealers only, closed to the public. Each dealer has to be registered at an ADESA auction before receiving a bid badge or buying cars online.

Below you will find a series of Web pages, links and printable files that will assist you with the process of registering at your local ADESA Auction facility. Several of these files have been created with Adobe Acrobat for security reasons. To view these files you must have Adobe Acrobat Viewer installed on your computer. If you do not have this program you candownload a free version. These files may also be obtained at your local ADESA auction.

In addition to completing and submitting the required dealer registration forms listed below, please provide copies of the following documents:

  • State dealer’s license or equivalent required state document
  • Current dealer bond, if required by your state
  • Current sales tax certificate
  • Copy of a voided company business check
  • Current salesperson’s license for each representative, if required by your state

Each representative will need to go to the Dealer Registration counter at one of our auctions to have their current driver’s license scanned into Auction ACCESS. If the representative plans to buy online only, please provide a legible copy of their current driver’s license.

ALL of the ADESA and Auction ACCESS forms listed below are required in order to register and participate either online or at any of our U.S. whole car auctions.

Required ADESA Forms:

MTC (Uniform Sales & Use Tax Certificate)
Personal Guaranty
Power of Attorney
Title Handling Form
IRS W-9 Form
US Auction Policy (Terms & Conditions)
NAAA Arbitration Policy
ADESA As-Is Policy
ADESA Post Sale Inspection Policy

Required Auction Access Forms:

Please download the following forms from the Auction Access website.

  • Application
  • Bank Authorization Letter
  • Dealership Credit Information Form
  • Individual Authorization Letter
  • Dealer Authorization/Removal Letter

After completing the documents, please fax or mail them to the dealer registration department at one of the ADESA auctions you would like to attend. You can obtain address, phone and fax contact information using the ADESA Auction List.

manheim market reporting ( MMR ) for car dealers goes mobile

Manheim Expands Mobile Services

myMobile 4 color logo

Stay on top of your business with the latest mobile features from Manheim. To experience on-the-go convenience of some of the site’s most popular features, go to www.manheim.com from any mobile device, or download the Manheim app for iPhone® and Android™.

The New and Improved Manheim App

With the full Manheim set of tools at your fingertips, you can always find the vehicle you need, no matter where you are. New features include:

Apple App Store logo

  • Scan a VIN, get the MMR.
  • Full vehicle search.
  • Bid, Buy Now, or Make an Offer.
  • Simulcast proxy bidding.
  • CarFax, AutoCheck, and condition reports.

Android Market logo

To download the new Manheim app, just search “Manheim” in the App StoreSM or Android Marketplace, or scan the QR code at right.

Get the Condition Information You Need Right on Your Mobile Device!

Now, you can view condition reports and seller disclosure information with ease from your phone, iPad, or other web-enabled device. With condition reports and seller disclosure information optimized for mobile use, you can:

Manheim app store QR code

  • Access vehicle condition information anytime, anywhere.
  • Get all of the information you need to make smart business decisions.
  • See the exact same information you expect to see on desktop reports.

Did You Know?

A 2009 study of dealers’ mobile Internet use inspired Manheim to develop a variety of mobile services to help you source and manage pre-owned inventory anywhere your business takes you. Other recently-enhanced mobile features include:

  • Manheim Market Report (MMR): Offering a faster, free and simplified version of Internet MMR for dealers using handheld mobile devices.
  • Mobile Search allows you to easily search Manheim’s entire online and in-lane inventory.
  • Remote access to the mobile version of My Workbook enables you to review all previously saved searches and to save new vehicles.

car dealer selling tutorials from manheim auto auction

Selling with Manheim

Let us help you become an expert at selling with Manheim.

Testimonial

“A never ending source to wholesale a car, you know? Access to the entire country: the advantage is being about to list cars at the click of a button and to reach everybody. ”

- Joe BoganskiThomson BMW

Tutorials

OVE: MyLot

play

02:50

Find out how to sell online directly from your lot—the quickest and easiest way to sell excess inventory.

Simulcast Everywhere: Remote Seller

play

01:43

Learn everything you need to represent and sell your vehicles from any location when it’s not possible to attend the auction.

MAFS: How to floorplan vehicles and more

play

01:26

Learn how floorplanning your vehicles with MAFS can help optimize your business.

Frontline: Retail Ready

play

03:17

Learn about Frontline services and how they ensure your vehicles are retail ready, so you can sell at higher prices.

Simulcast Everywhere: How to set up a sale

play

03:01

Learn everything you need to start selling your inventory with a Simulcast Everywhere sale.

OVE: Add and Edit Vehicles

play

06:35

Learn how to add and edit inventory, pictures, and prices, as well as preview your listings.

MAFS: How to floorplan vehicles and more

play

01:26

Learn how floorplanning your vehicles with MAFS can help optimize your business.

Simulcast Everywhere: Remote Seller

play

01:43

Learn everything you need to represent and sell your vehicles from any location when it’s not possible to attend the auction.

OVE: MyLot

play

02:50

Find out how to sell online directly from your lot—the quickest and easiest way to sell excess inventory.

download the dmv auction access application

Download Forms

car dealer flooring thru MAFS ( manheim financial services )

MAFS

Manheim Financial Services (MAFS) provides floor plan inventory financing for independent car dealers and rental dealers in the U.S. and Canada. Manheim has over 90 locations across the U.S. and Canada, each of which includes a MAFS office and service-oriented staff to service our customer’s floor plan needs.

In addition, MAFS is also available in more than 125 independent non-Manheim auctions, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Thrifty Car Sales and ATC-Open. Together with the Manheim Service Centers, MAFS is available at more than 200 locations with more to come in the future.

Products:

  • MAFS Inventory Financing
  • MAFS Rental Inventory Financing
  • MAFS Receivables Funding

MAFS

MAFS Inventory Financing:

MAFS provides inventory financing (floor planning). Our flexible terms allow you to maximize

Dealer Benefits

  • Financing can increase your available working capital
  • Competitive rates make it affordable
  • Up to 90-day inventory financing for the Gold Card
  • Up to 100% financing
  • Easier to complete the buying process than paying cash
  • Provides purchasing power at over 200 auctions

MAFS Rental Inventory Financing:

MAFS also provides rental inventory financing. MAFS rental program provides all the advantages a dealer would expect from partnering with an industry leader. As complicated as the rental business can be, MAFS makes financing a rental dealer’s inventory easy.

Dealer Benefits

  • Industry leading customer service
  • Up to 24 months financing frees up capital
  • Up to 100% financing
  • Competitive rates
  • In many cases, no upfront cash on vehicle purchases
  • Convenient and flexible depreciation schedules

45-day-special

MAFS Receivables Funding:

MAFS offers receivables financing to selected MAFS dealers. Primarily point of sale funding, this is a full recourse program designed to complement the entire package of MAFS programs.

MAFS also has a 45 Special program. It has many of the same benefits of the Gold Card, but requires no insurance and no financials. With limited paperwork , dealers can take advantage of a MAFS floor plan quickly.

Dealer Benefits

  • MAFS receivables funding will free up your capital to increase your sales volume, and expand your portfolio
  • Provides up to 100% financing
  • Dealer retains control of contracts
  • Dealer continues to collect & service the retail account
  • Payoff of MAFS financed vehicles is easy and seamless

MAFS also offers the following programs for unique needs:

  • Recreational Vehicles – a special financing program tailored to fit the unique needs of dealers selling driveable RV’s, tow behind campers, trailers, 5th wheel trailers,ATV’s and motorcycles.
  • BIG Truck – a special financing program tailored to fit the unique needs of dealers selling Class 6, 7 and 8 type trucks and vehicles with a gross vehicle weight (GVW) of 19,501 lbs. and above.
  • Insurance Services – MAFS can offer dealers physical damage/open lot coverage at very competitive rates.
  • Dealers enjoy the savings associated with being part of a large group plan.

get licensed quickly with gotplates.com

ZONINGBONDFINGERPRINTS

THEN

CAR DEALER CLASS

800-901-5950

gotplates.com

zurich insurance offers 7 tips for red flag rules compliance

IF YOU OFFER CREDIT…..GET RED FLAG CERTIFIED

WITH

GOTPLATES.COM

800-901-5950

+++++

To help ensure your dealership gets and stays in compliance, Zurich insurance recommends the following seven steps:

1. Put the program in writing

Your program must contain reasonable policies and procedures to address four primary responsibilities under the rule. The rule also states that each program must be documented in writing. While potentially burdensome, this requirement has obvious advantages to the dealer. It forms the basis for the employee training that is required by the rule, and makes responding to government audits and inquiries possible.

2. Make a list of patterns, practices or specific activities that could be red flags signaling possible identity theft.

Your policies and procedures should require that you become at least reasonably certain of your customer’s buyer’s identity. A supplement to the rule on the FTC’s website provides illustrations of 26 possible red flags that fall into the following five categories:

—Receiving alerts, notifications or warnings from a consumer-reporting agency

—The customer presents suspicious documents.

—The customer presents suspicious personal identifying information, such as a suspect address.

—Dealership staff notices unusual use of or suspicious activity within an existing account.

—You receive notices from customers, victims of identity theft, law enforcement authorities or other businesses about possible identity theft in connection with an existing account.

Note, not all 26 possible red flags will be relevant to the way your dealership does business.

In particular, unless you have accounts to which customers can make charges after origination, for example, house credit accounts, the seven possible red flags in category four are not likely to apply to your dealership.

You also need to guard against identity theft risks that result from employee access to account information. Employee access should already be limited as part of your overall information security program.

3. Make a list of methods used to detect and evaluate if a red flag has occurred.

The program should describe procedures used to verify customer information and detect when information is incorrect. Some procedures include:

—Specifying acceptable forms of identifying information required of each finance customer

—Specifying procedures to verify identifying information, for example, using third-party resources to confirm identification or detect fraud

—Using a system to monitor employee compliance relative to their access and use of customer account information

4. Describe how your dealership will respond when red flags are detected.

The program must contain reasonable policies for responding to red flags detected during a transaction. This should include a procedure for escalating unresolved situations to senior management.

Some appropriate responses to unresolved red flags would be to:

—Not continue the transaction

—Use additional resources to verify the customer’s identity.

—Notify law enforcement.

—Determine that no response is warranted.

5. Document all red flag responses and keep them in the customer file.

All red flag responses should also be kept in a dealership file to be used to maintain and update the program.

6. Detail a plan to update the program periodically.

Update the program to reflect changes in risks to customers or to your dealership’s safety and security based upon:

—Your experience with identity theft

—New methods of identity theft

—New methods of identity theft prevention and detection

—Changes in the types of accounts offered or maintained by your dealership

—Changes in your dealership’s business or structure such as mergers and changes in service provider arrangements

7. Follow the Red Flags Rule guidelines in managing the program.

The rule provides for some specific administrative actions that need to take place to adequately manage your program. These include that your program must:

—Be approved and implemented by your dealership’s board of directors or, if no board exists, a designated member of the senior management team.

—Be periodically evaluated to determine if updates are necessary.

—Include training for relevant staff on their obligations under the program.

—Be able to ensure service providers have reasonable procedures to detect, prevent and mitigate the risk of identity theft.

Penalties for Violations

Penalties for violations of these regulations are stiff. These include the following:

—A “knowing” violation of the rule is a violation of the FTC Act, which provides for a $3,500 civil penalty for each violation.

—Enforcement actions by the FTC can carry penalties of up to $11,000 per violation, per day.

—Dealers may also be liable under state unfair and deceptive acts, and practices law, which may include individual and class action claims.

Additional resources from the FTC can be found here.

how to bring a used car dealer into small claims court

+++++

Find out how to increase your chances of success with used car dealer lawsuits

Successfully suing used vehicle dealers can be tricky. Unlike new vehicle dealers, who are usually somewhat dependent upon their reputation in the community for honesty, a fair percentage of used vehicle dealers don’t have a good reputation to start with and survive by becoming experts at self-protection.

The principal self-protection device employed by used vehicle dealers is the “as is” designation in the written sales contract. The salesperson may praise a car to the sky, but when you read the contract, you will see it clearly stated that the seller takes absolutely no responsibility for the condition of the vehicle and that it is sold “as is.”

To successfully sue a used car dealer, you must be able to prove that:

  • you suffered a financial loss (this is not hard if you had to pay for repairs), and
  • the dealer is legally responsible for your damages.

This second point is often harder to prove. Almost surely, the used car dealer will testify that he or she had no way of knowing how long a ten-year-old Dodge would last and that, for this very reason, the car was sold “as is.” The dealer will then show the judge the written contract that not only contains the “as is” designation, but also “this written contract is the entire agreement between the parties and no oral statements or representations made by the dealer or any salesperson are part of the contract.”

How can you fight this sort of cynical semi-fraud? It’s difficult to do after the fact. The time for self-protection is before you buy a vehicle, when you have the opportunity to have it checked by an expert and to get a vehicle history report. There are a lot of online resources for checking a vehicle’s history, particularly if you have the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). In addition, you have the opportunity to refuse to close the deal unless the salesperson’s claims about the great condition of the car are put in the contract. Of course, after the damage has been done, good advice such as this isn’t worth much. If you have just been cheated on a used car deal, you want to know what, if anything, you can do now. Here are some suggestions.

Your state’s lemon law may apply to used vehicles. In some states, the lemon law applies to used as well as new cars. Check to see if your situation is covered.

Argue fraud. If the car broke almost immediately after you took it out of the used car lot, you can file in small claims court and argue that you were defrauded. Your theory is that, no matter what the written contract said, there was a clear implication that you purchased a car, not a junk heap. When the dealer produces the “as is” contract you signed, argue that it is no defense to fraud.

Did the dealer make promises? If the dealer made any promises, either in writing or orally, about the good condition of the vehicle, he or she may be required to live up to them. Why? Because statements about a product that you rely on as part of deciding whether to purchase the product constitute an express warranty that the dealer breaches if the promise turns out to be a lie. This is true even if the seller had you sign a contract with an “as is” statement that disclaims all warranties, because an “as is” statement does not disclaim an express warranty if one is made. The key to winning this sort of case is to produce a witness to the dealer’s laudatory statements about the vehicle, copies of ads that state the car is in good shape, and anything else that will back up your story.

There also may be an implied warranty. There are two types of implied warranties. One type–the implied warranty of fitness–means that the vehicle is warranted to work for a particular purpose (say, consistency). The more common implied warranty is for merchantability. Here, you would argue that the car you bought was so defective that it didn’t meet the reasonable standards expected of even a used car.

A radical remedy: Give the car back and stop payment. You may consider having the car towed back to the lot and then refusing to make future payments. This option should be considered only in an extreme situation, but it does shift the burden of taking legal action to the other side, at which point you can defend on the basis of fraud (see above). If you take this approach, be sure you have excellent documentation that the car was below any reasonable expectations. And be sure to write a letter detailing the circumstances surrounding your extreme difficulties with the dealer, along with a convincing statement that, taken as a whole, the dealer’s conduct amounts to consumer fraud. Send copies to the dealer and the bank or finance company to whom you pay your loan. Of course, you will probably have already made a down payment, so even in this situation you may wish to initiate action in small claims court to try to recover it.

Your credit rating will suffer. If you stop making payments, it will appear as a default on your credit report and will affect your credit score significantly, so think very carefully before choosing this course of action.

How to find signs of fraud. If you really suspect that you have been defrauded, have your car checked by an experienced mechanic who will be willing to write a letter explaining the findings. If the mechanic can find affirmative evidence that you were cheated, you will greatly improve your small claims case. The mechanic might, for example, find that the speedometer had been tampered with in violation of state law, or that a heavy grade of truck oil had been put in the crankcase so that the car wouldn’t belch smoke. Also, this is the sort of case where subpoenaing documents might help. Specifically, you might wish to subpoena the car dealer’s records, including any that indicate the dealer’s purchase price and the condition of the car when it was purchased. It might also be helpful to learn the name of the car’s former owner, with the idea of contacting that person. You can also check the car’s history through an online service (search the Internet for “vehicle history”), which can tell you whether the car was stolen or salvaged, or was used as a rental or a taxi.

Consider other remedies besides small claims court. These can include checking with your state department of consumer affairs or the local department of motor vehicles to see if used car lots are regulated. In many states, the department of motor vehicles licenses used car dealers and can be very helpful in getting disputes resolved, particularly where your complaint is one of many against the same dealer for similar practices. Also, contact your district attorney’s office. Most now have a consumer fraud division, which can be of great help. If you can convince someone at the fraud division that what happened to you smells rotten, or if your complaint happens to be against someone they have already identified as a borderline criminal, they will likely call the used car dealer in for a chat. In theory, the D.A.’s only job is to bring a criminal action, which will be of no direct aid in getting your money back, but in practice, negotiations can often result in restitution. In plain words, this means that the car dealer may be told, “Look, you’re right on the edge of the law here (or maybe over the edge). If you clean up your act, which means taking care of all complaints against you and seeing that there are no more, we will close your file. If you don’t, I suggest you hire a good lawyer, because you are going to need one.”

by: Ralph Warner

unlicensed car dealer sells a stolen vehicle ( get the pink slip )

Couple Arrested After Unknowingly Buying Stolen Car

Salesman says he’ll issue a refund “as soon as I get the money.”

After seeing a good deal for a used BMW on Craigslist, an Orange County couple bought the car from the seller only to be handcuffed for driving a stolen vehicle. John Cádiz Klemack reports for the NBC4 News at 11 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013.

 Farrah and Tom Johnson filled out a contract and paid $3,700 cash to buy a clean, used 2001 BMW 325i from a man who seemed professional.

“I was all excited to have this nice BMW,” Farrah Johnson said. “It seemed like a good price for the mileage.”

For a few days, they were happy with their purchase – until police officers pulled them over.

It turned out that they had bought a stolen car. And when they went back to the business that had sold it to them, they found just the empty husk of the shop they had visited just days earlier.

The dealership was not licensed to do business. The salesman was nowhere to be found.

Experts said that the Johnsons could have avoided their predicament by insisting on a pink slip. The couple said the salesman promised he would mail it after he took care of some final paperwork issues.

NBC4′s John Cadiz Klemack spoke over the phone with the salesman, Ramon Vladimir Torres Quiroz, who said he has sold 200 cars and received no complaints.

“Don’t judge me yet,” Quiroz said.

He said he plans to issue the Johnsons a refund.

“I’m working on it,” he said. “As soon as I get the money, I’ll get them their money back.”

tesla dealership battle moves to ohio

By  Dan Gearino

A trade group for Ohio car dealers is asking a Franklin County court to rescind Tesla Motors’ license to sell new cars, citing what they say are violations of Ohio law.

The plaintiffs in the case also include several central Ohio dealer groups, such as Midwestern Auto Group of Dublin, Ricart Automotive of Groveport and several of the Germain family dealerships.

“If a license is not granted with proper authority, then that license should be rescinded,” said Sara Bruce, vice president of legal affairs for the Ohio Automobile Dealers Association.

The defendants are the Ohio Department of Public Safety, the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles and Tesla.

In the suit, which was filed in Franklin County Common Pleas Court, the dealers say that the state agencies improperly approved Tesla’s dealer license earlier this year because the company did not provide a copy of its contract with the manufacturer of the vehicles to be sold.

In this case, the manufacturer and the retailer are the same company, but the dealers say that the law still calls for proper documentation.

Even if Tesla had provided a contract, it would not have been valid because the law requires such an agreement to be between “two separate contracting parties,” Bruce said.

Tesla did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Earlier this month, Tesla opened a store at Easton, the automaker’s first retail outlet in Ohio.

Also this month, the auto dealers association made an unsuccessful attempt to get the Ohio General Assembly to outlaw Tesla’s business model.

The lawsuit is the next step in the dealers’ attempt to stop Tesla from gaining a foothold in the state.

Unlike most auto brands, Tesla sells its all-electric cars directly to consumers through company-owned stores.

This is different from the way established auto brands sell their products. Companies such as Ford, General Motors and Honda sell through a network of independently owned dealers.

Established dealers have raised concerns that Tesla’s model is opening the door for other automakers to open company-owned stores, which they say would undermine the concept of an independent dealer network.

The dealers say they are trying to preserve a system that employs 50,000 Ohioans, while Tesla says the dealers are monopolists who are wary of real competition.

Tesla has faced similar legislative and legal battles in other states.

dgearino@dispatch.com

we now offer car dealer licensing school in spanish

we are the leaders in

dmv certified car dealer education

gotplates.com

800-901-5950

in response to high demand

we are now offering a spanish language car dealer class

in modesto at crows landing for those who prefer a spanish teacher

we offer a downloadable spanish handbook after the class

Click here for Crows Landing class dates

you may call the instructor direct

Jorge Elizalde

El Tio Auto Sales

209-538-1789

got1