NMVTIS glossary

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NMVTIS Glossary

 

Anti-Car Theft Act: Act passed in 1992 to prevent and deter auto theft. Title II of the Act authorizes NMVTIS and is intended to address automobile title fraud. The NMVTIS Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on January 30, 2009.

Auto Recycler: A business that acquires vehicles for recycled use as parts, scrap, or similar purposes.

Brand: Descriptive labels regarding the status of a motor vehicle, such as “junk,” “salvage,” and “flood” vehicles.

Certificate of Title (Title): A document issued by a state showing ownership of an automobile.

Consumer: The individual or entity buying an automobile or financing the purchase of an automobile. Consumers include private individuals, dealers, auction companies or entities engaged in the business of purchasing used automobiles, lenders financing the purchase of new or used automobiles, and automobile dealers.

Insurance Carrier: An individual or entity engaged in the business of underwriting automobile insurance.

Junk Automobile: An automobile that:
(A) Is incapable of operating on public streets, roads, and highways; and
(B) Has no value except as a source of parts or scrap.

Junk Yard: An individual or entity engaged in the business of acquiring or owning junk automobiles for:
(A) Resale in their entirety or as spare parts; or
(B) Rebuilding, restoration, or crushing.

NMVTIS Operator: The individual or entity authorized or designated as the operator of NMVTIS under 49 U.S.C. 30502(b), or the office designated by the Attorney General, if there is no authorized or designated individual or entity.

Purchaser: The individual or entity buying an automobile or financing the purchase of an automobile. Purchasers may be private citizens, dealers, auction companies or entities engaged in the business or purchasing used automobiles, lenders financing the purchase of new or used automobiles, and automobile dealers.

Salvage Automobile: An automobile that is damaged by collision, fire, flood, accident, trespass, or other event, to the extent that its fair salvage value plus the cost of repairing the automobile for legal operation on public streets, roads, and highways would be more than the fair market value of the automobile immediately before the event that caused the damage. Salvage automobiles include automobiles determined to be a total loss under the law of the applicable jurisdiction or designated as a total loss by an insurer under the terms of its policies, regardless of whether or not the ownership of the vehicle is transferred to the insurance carrier.

Salvage Pool: An entity that acquires junk and salvage automobiles from a variety of parties and consolidates them for resale at a common point of sale.

Salvage Yard: An individual or entity engaged in the business of acquiring or owning salvage automobiles for:
(A) resale in their entirety or as spare parts; or
(B) rebuilding, restoration, or crushing.

This definition includes scrap vehicle shredders and scrap metal processors, as well as “pull- or pick-apart yards,” salvage pools, salvage auctions, and other types of auctions, businesses, and individuals that handle salvage vehicles (including vehicles declared a “total loss”).

Total Loss: The cost of repairing such vehicles plus projected supplements plus projected diminished resale value plus rental reimbursement expense exceeds the cost of buying the damaged motor vehicle at its pre-accident value, minus the proceeds of selling the damaged motor vehicle for salvage.

VIN: Vehicle Identification Number; a unique number given to each motor vehicle for identification purposes.

tesla business model faces another legal battle

By Dan Gearino

A trade group for Ohio car dealers is asking a Franklin County court to rescind Tesla Motors’ license to sell new cars, citing what they say are violations of Ohio law.

The plaintiffs in the case also include several central Ohio dealer groups, such as Midwestern Auto Group of Dublin, Ricart Automotive of Groveport and several of the Germain family dealerships.

“If a license is not granted with proper authority, then that license should be rescinded,” said Sara Bruce, vice president of legal affairs for the Ohio Automobile Dealers Association.

The defendants are the Ohio Department of Public Safety, the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles and Tesla.

In the suit, which was filed in Franklin County Common Pleas Court, the dealers say that the state agencies improperly approved Tesla’s dealer license earlier this year because the company did not provide a copy of its contract with the manufacturer of the vehicles to be sold.

In this case, the manufacturer and the retailer are the same company, but the dealers say that the law still calls for proper documentation.

Even if Tesla had provided a contract, it would not have been valid because the law requires such an agreement to be between “two separate contracting parties,” Bruce said.

Tesla did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Earlier this month, Tesla opened a store at Easton, the automaker’s first retail outlet in Ohio.

Also this month, the auto dealers association made an unsuccessful attempt to get the Ohio General Assembly to outlaw Tesla’s business model.

The lawsuit is the next step in the dealers’ attempt to stop Tesla from gaining a foothold in the state.

Unlike most auto brands, Tesla sells its all-electric cars directly to consumers through company-owned stores.

This is different from the way established auto brands sell their products. Companies such as Ford, General Motors and Honda sell through a network of independently owned dealers.

Established dealers have raised concerns that Tesla’s model is opening the door for other automakers to open company-owned stores, which they say would undermine the concept of an independent dealer network.

The dealers say they are trying to preserve a system that employs 50,000 Ohioans, while Tesla says the dealers are monopolists who are wary of real competition.

Tesla has faced similar legislative and legal battles in other states.

dgearino@dispatch.com

working behind the scenes…would you like to help???

Celebrating The Life Of CHP Public Safety Dispatcher Lynde Cook

January 22, 2014

“She loved the department and loved what she did.  Never did she let her illness get in the way, she never wanted to bring people down.” -  Victor Tovar, CHP-PSDA Vice President

UKIAH-  On January 11, 2014, family, friends, colleagues and Ukiah community members celebrated the life of CHP Public Safety Dispatcher Lynde Cook.  Cook passed away November 7 at the age of 50 after a nearly two year battle with stage IV lung cancer.

“We waited for all of her friends and relatives to travel here,” said Lois Cook, Lynde’s mother.  “Lynde told us all, ‘when I die, don’t cry for me, pour the champagne and raise a glass.’”

Lynde Cook

For 12 years, Lynde worked as a CHP Public Safety Dispatcher in Ukiah, the small town she was born and raised in.   She loved answering calls for help.

“Lynde started working for the CHP in 2000, right here in the Ukiah Communication Center where she stayed her entire career,” said Captain Jim Epperson, CHP Ukiah Area Commander.   “She was a very reliable and dedicated worker.  She was always willing to help whenever and wherever needed.  She had a true passion for dispatch!”

When Lynde was diagnosed with cancer,  she dispatched her own call for help, asking long-time, childhood and Facebook friends for support.   The group of women who stepped forward became known as Lynde’s Ladies.

“There was always somebody there for her,” said Lois Cook.  “They held a fundraiser with a band and a dance and an auction.  She had an incredible amount of support.”

“Our dispatchers become a very tight knit group,” said Alan Barcelona, president of the California Statewide Law Enforcement Association (CSLEA) which represents CHP dispatchers and  nearly 7,000 other law enforcement, public safety and consumer protection professionals who work for the State of California.   “They share experiences and stresses that are unique to emergency dispatch.  There is sadness in their hearts over Lynde’s passing, but they also remember what a vivacious and courageous  person she was, something I hope they can find strength in as they heal from this great loss.”

Lynde lived the first 18 years of her life in Ukiah.  She grew up on Robinson Creek Ranch with her four siblings. In school she was active in the marching band and involved in sports. She loved softball. Lynde attended Sacramento State University and remained in Sacramento for several years working and playing in softball leagues and tournaments including several All-State Championships.

While in Sacramento, Lynde joined the National Guard and served overseas during Desert Storm. She enjoyed other cultures and some of her favorite travel memories were of trips to Guatemala, South Africa, and her service time in Saudi Arabia.

Lynde leaves behind a 19 year old son.  Jalen Cook was the best part of Lynde’s life, her mother said.  Soon after Jalen was born, Lynde moved back to Ukiah to be closer to family.   She worked at the Ukiah Valley Medical Center as a medical assistant and  then became a dispatcher for CHP where she worked until her medical retirement in 2012.

“I loved her dearly and miss her beautiful smile and her quick wit and laughter,” said friend and fellow CHP Dispatcher Joanne Vital.  “She loved her job and was a very dedicated employee.  She would go the extra mile to solve a problem or find information for officers’ investigations.  She was a very caring person and a dear friend.”

“The outstanding character of hers, she was always smiling,” said Lois Cook.  “She kept her sense of humor.  She was cheerful.  She made other people feel good when she felt bad.  She fought hard.”

In addition to her son, Jalen,  Lynde is survived by her mother, Lois Cook of Ukiah, sisters Rhoby Cook of Hoopa,  Kristy Cook of Takoma Park, MD, and brother Kirby Cook of Hamilton, MT. She was predeceased by her father, Waldo Cook, and brother, Randy Cook.

Memorial donations may be made to the Ukiah Cancer Resource Center at 590 S. Dora Street in Ukiah, the National Foundation for Cancer Research, or the Lynde C. Cook Memorial Athletic Scholarship through Ukiah High School.

Car Dealer Auto Broker Training

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Autobroker s Endorsement

An autobroker’s endorsement requires payment of fees as required by subdivision (d) of Section 9262 of the California Vehicle Code.

A dealer may not engage in brokering a retail sales transaction without having an autobroker’s endorsement to their dealer’s license.

Upon issuance of an autobroker’s endorsement to a dealer’s license, the department shall furnish the dealer with an autobroker’s log.  The autobroker’s log remains the property of the department and may be taken at any time for inspection.

The autobroker’s log must contain the following information with respect to each retail sale brokered by that dealer:

  • Vehicle identification number of brokered vehicle
  • Date of brokering agreement
  • Selling dealer’s name, address, and dealer number
  • Name of consumer
  • Brokering dealer’s name, address, and dealer number (CVC Section 11735)

A dealer who brokers a motor vehicle sale shall deposit directly into a trust account any purchase money, including purchase deposits, it receives from a consumer or a consumer’s lender.

  • All trust accounts required by CVC Section 11737 shall be maintained at a branch of a bank, savings and loan association, or credit union regulated by the state or the government of the United States.

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Click here for Crows Landing class dates

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Jorge Elizalde

El Tio Auto Sales

209-538-1789

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fair market value pricing label now required

AB 1534 (Wieckowski)

Vehicles: dealers: used vehicle sales: labeling requirements.

Existing law regulates the accuracy of information provided to consumers during vehicle sales, including the information contained in advertising, brochures, and manuals, as specified.

Existing law also requires manufacturers, as specified, to disclose certain information regarding a vehicles engine, as specified, by affixing a label on the vehicle. A violation of these provisions is an infraction.

This bill requires a licensed dealer, as defined, to affix to and to prominently and conspicuously display a label on any used vehicle offered for retail sale that states the reasonable market value of the vehicle.

The bill requires the label to contain specified information used to determine the vehicles reasonable market value and the date the value was determined.

The bill requires a licensed dealer to provide to a prospective buyer of the used vehicle a copy of any information obtained from a nationally recognized pricing guide that the licensed dealer used to determine the reasonable market value of the vehicle.

The bill requires the label to meet all the following conditions:

 

a)   Be in writing with a heading that reads “REASONABLE

MARKET VALUE OF THIS VEHICLE” in at least 16-point bold

type and text in at least 12-point type.

 

b)   Be located adjacent to the window sticker identifying

the equipment provided with the vehicle, or if none,

located prominently and conspicuously on the vehicle.

 

c)   Contain the information used to determine the reasonable

market value, including, but not limited to, use of a

nationally recognized pricing guide for used vehicles, and

the date the reasonable market value was determined.

 

d)   Indicate that the reasonable market value is being

provided only for comparison shopping and is not the retail

sale price or the advertised price of the vehicle.

 

The bill defines “nationally recognized pricing guide” as including,

but not limited to, the Kelley Blue Book, Edmunds, the Black

Book, or the National Automobile Dealers’ Association (NADA)

Guide.

 

 

 

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WE TEACH CAR DEALER EDUCATION

HERE ARE THE 3 MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS ON OUR

DMV CAR DEALER LICENSE CHECKLIST

ZONING, FINGERPRINTS, BOND

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The Dmv Zoning approval is required of each car dealer license location

Dmv Zoning approval is done at the local level ( planning department )

Dmv requires completion of a specific form

Dmv OL902 Zoning form:  http://dmv.ca.gov/forms/ol/ol902.htm

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The car dealer license process requires LiveScan Fingerprints

LiveScan Fingerprints are dispatched electronically

Dmv requires LiveScan clearance to issue a temporary car dealer license ( 30-45 days )

Dmv 8016 LiveScan form:  http://dmv.ca.gov/forms/ol/dmv8016.pdf

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Each car dealer application must submit a car dealer bond

10k bond for wholesale, 24 cars or less per year

50k bond for all retail, autobroker or wholesale above 24 cars per year

Car Dealer Bond Quote: EZDealerBond.com

Call our bond agent mike for additional help:  714-797-5780

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WE MAKE IT SIMPLE FOR YOU

TO GET LICENSED

#1 DMV CERTIFIED CAR DEALER SCHOOL

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may i help you

5 helpful tips for getting your DMV wholesale car dealer license

  1. Sign up for our 6 hour Car Dealer Pre-Licensing Class. Follow the steps that you are taught, and then get approved by the California DMV as a wholesale dealer.
  2. Utilize the Web. Did you know that most wholesale dealers search the internet prior to purchasing a vehicle? A good wholesaler will recognize a low priced car at auction buy it and resell it a week later at the same auction.
  3. Keep in mind that delivery of the vehicle to the buyer must occur at the sellers licensed location. Some wholesalers will buy seasoned stock ( vehicles which are front line ready on a retailers lot but approaching 60 days in inventory ) and swap them out for vehicles freshly obtained. This allows the used car sales manager to restart the clock on that seasoned stock. These deals are often done book for book, the wholesaler ends up with added value. In a front line ready car the wholesaler can sell to another dealer, but it will often take a series of these book for book trades before you can actually see profits. Many small used car lots do not have the time to go to auction. A good wholesaler can stock these smaller lots and make a small profit on each car.
  4. Don’t ever consign a vehicle to another dealer. The wholesale license is a good starting place for the beginner; lesser bond, easier zoning and access to the market. Dealer plates and insurance are included in the wholesale package but as a wholesaler one can only buy and sell within the industry. That means as a wholesaler you can sell only to other dealers, there is no buying off the street. If and when a wholesaler has a vehicle to sell to the public he/she may draft that sale through a licensed retailer, this is call this a drafted sale.
  5. Remember the drafted sale creates liability for the retailer. Typical draft fee is $ 500. We advise the following: no loss selling ( wholesaler must sell higher than acquisition cost ), smog safety and verification provided by wholesaler, wholesaler as contact person on the buyers guide, statement from wholesaler assuming all liability if customer is not happy. Then the retailer collects and pays all taxes and fees, and sends the documents to DMV for processing.

Tips

  • Wholesale Dealers cannot sell to the Public (only to other Car Dealers).
  • Wholesale Car Dealers have a lower bond requirement and spend less on insurance.
  • When selling to the public you must use a Drafted Sale.
  • Wholesale dealers provide a much needed asset to the retail car market. Wholesalers provide cars to retail dealers and often facilitate trades among dealers. A good car buyer will make a little on each car (perhaps $ 300), but can only sell up to 24 cars in one year.

Related wikiHows

Sources and Citations

dmv car dealer application

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License Plate Inserts

(.015) One Color

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* One time charges may apply
See below for pricing

Effective and cost efficient advertising! Made of weather resistant .015 thick white polystyrene. Your custom imprint is screen printed for durability. Size: 6 inches tall x 12 inches wide with rounded corners and pre-spaced holes. Quantity discount prices available on 250 or more. Minimum order is 250 inserts. For art charges see below. Orders are subject to a 10% overrun/under run and are charged accordingly. When ordering, please note the following in the information field shown above. (1) Desired imprint. (2) Choose Imprint Color (all standard colors available). Your imprint will be printed on a white background. (3) If you want the background colored instead, this is called a reverse. Choose Background Color (all standard colors available). We will fax over a layout for approval. Any changes other than corrections for our errors, may incur an additional art charge. Art Charges for 1 Color .015 Insert. $65 charge on orders of 250*. $45 One-Time charge on first time orders of 500 and above. Any reorder of the exact same custom design does not incur an art charge. * Due to small quantity run, set up charge for 250 is recurring
  • Model: 706 .015 1C
  • 949-837-4088

 

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